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DIY

Cute + Easy DIY Banner

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If you’re in needing of a quick and simple decoration, these tape banners will hit the spot. You can make a decorative banner out of any sort of tape; I like funky colored duck tape and washi tape best. But, you could literally use any tape: painters tape, masking tape, packing tape, scotch tape… and any other tape that exists.

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For this project I used:

White Duck Tape *

Washi Tape* (decorative paper tape)

Jute String (any thin string type material will work perfectly)

Scissors

The first step is to decide how long you want your banner to be, pull that much of the string out of the roll (or work as you go). Lay the string on a flat surface (couch, countertop, floor- anywhere!), and pull out a piece of tape that is at least twice as long as you want your little banner flag to be. Lay it under the string, with the string in the middle, perpendicularly, and snip your tape. Make sure you leave enough string to allow for tying or taping down for hanging, before your first banner flag is placed.

IMG_0115    Now, as perfectly as possible (it’s totally okay if you mess up, this is your first try!) fold the tape in half so the tape is adhered to itself. If you have any bubbles you can take a credit card or bone scraper and push the bubbles out. Wrinkles are a little harder to remove, if you have to cut that flag off and start over, no worries! It’s a small amount of tape compared to how big your roll is.

IMG_0116Next, decide what shape(s) you want your banner flag to be. Cut your tape as you wish, and voila you have one flag!

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Repeat the process as often as you’d like until your banner is to the desired length.

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Mix and match shapes and tape styles. If you want to have some more fun, add some fabric pieces or clip photos to your banner with clothespins. Cheers to an easy, inexpensive + versatile decor piece!

Happy making!

Jessica

*links are suggestions of where to purchase, most craft stores will have these supplies

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DIY, Paint Project

Chalk Paint and Furniture Wax to Create an Aged Texture

Inspiration piece for a Country Chic Paint makeover by Loveleigh Creative Soul

Hello there! It’s been raining something fierce in Oklahoma, so my big projects are on hold and I’ve been focusing on a lot of facelifts for my existing decor. In this tutorial I will discuss how easy it is to create a new finish with chalk paint and furniture wax. The vision piece for this easy makeover was a grey-whitewashed floor lamp. Rather than whitewashing the mirror frame, I used brush strokes to give dimension and texture with a chalk paint and furniture wax.

Country Chic Chalk Paint makeover

Country Chic Chalk Paint makeover

For this project I used:

Hurricane Country Chic Paint

Country Chic White Wax

Synthetic Bristle Brush

Wax Brush

Painters Tape (dependent on project)

Sandpaper

Razor Blade

Clean Cloth

Project Piece

Project Piece

The original finish [actually this mirror has had 3 previous face-lifts, it’s a part of the family!] on this mirror was matte, so a quick clean cloth wipe down was all the surface prep that was necessary. After taping off the inside of the frame with painters tape, I was ready to roll.

Hurricane Paint

Hurricane Paint

I used Hurricane Country Chic Paint and applied it with a synthetic bristle brush. I made sure my brush was pretty saturated with paint [not dripping off causing a mess, but enough paint to last for several strokes], I painted the first layer a little thicker than a typical first layer would be. For this finish, I need paint strokes. With that being said, I painted the second layer before the first layer was entirely dry. It is possible to paint the second layer too soon, so look for your paint to “flash over” or go from a shiny wet appearance to a matte looking finish [chalk paint does not dry glossy, so if it looks glossy it’s still too wet]. Depending on how thick your first layer is, you should let your paint dry at least 15 minutes [your paint brush will still drag up some paint with your second coat, creating the needed brush stroke texture].

Base Paint Layer

Base Paint Layer

The second coat enhances the paint strokes and creates deeper texture, which will allow the wax to stand out more later on. Note- your piece may need more than two coats of paint dependent on color and the base coat you’re covering.

Sanding Chalk Paint

Sanding Chalk Paint

Once the paint was entirely dry, I lightly sanded the surface with medium grit sandpaper, and sanded through the new paint layers on the frames edges for added dimension [the base coat was white-ish, so exposing some of that color was productive to complete the look I had in mind.]

Sanding for dimension

Sanding for dimension

Lastly, the wax application was achieved with a wax brush in a crosshatch [horizontal and vertical lines] fashion. I wanted to keep distinct lines in the finish and not create a circular or rubbed in look [the paint stroke appearance helps this effect].

This step is really easy, and nearly impossible to mess up. As you can see, the first swipe of wax is pretty contrasting, Country Chic’s White Wax is super malleable and will move as you need with ease using a wax brush. Waxing continuously back and forth, I covered the entire surface [and the sides] working into the crevices and detail to enhance the look.

Finished Project

Finished Project

After completing the wax application, I took a razor blade to the seam between the frame and the tape to easily remove the painters tape, preventing any paint peeling [not likely with chalk paint, but better safe than sorry]. I let the wax set a full day before returning the mirror back to the wall. This chalk paint and furniture wax project was super easy and resulted in a wonderful updated piece.

 

Happy painting!

 

Jessica

 

 

DIY, Paint Project

Pebble Beach Planked Table using Chalk Paint and Glaze

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In this quick tutorial I will explain, step by step, how I changed up this little end table with 4 products, wooden planks and a few tools; into a gorgeous grey planked table.

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This table is pretty sturdy. The legs have a lot of detail and to my surprise it had a Formica covered top. Rather than removing the adhered top I chose to plank the top with pine boards (note- if you wanted to paint over the Formica without removing it, that is 100% doable. The top would likely need some sanding and a few coats of paint followed by a seal [Country Chic Tough Coat would work perfectly].) The project went super quick, allowing for optimal dry time between finishing coats was the only step preventing it from being finished in a few hours!

For this project I used:

1×8 Pine board

Country Chic Pebble Beach Paint

Country Chic Trigger Metallic Accent Cream

Country Chic White Wax

Wax Brush

1.5-inch synthetic bristle paintbrush

Weathered Gray wood stain

100 grit sand paper

Sanding block

Rubble gloves

Clean fabric cloth

Damp paper towel

Wood screws

Drill

 

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After a quick wipe down with a clean damp cloth and sanding session with my sanding block (just to smooth the existing paint), I began with the basecoat of Pebble Beach, applied with a 1.5-inch synthetic bristle paintbrush. This entire project could have been done with a sample size paint (4 oz) with plenty left over for a second project.

With two smooth and quick coats of Pebble Beach, I moved onto my next step: Metallic Accent Cream application.

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To apply I used my right pointer finger (has more control than any other finger) and my right ring finger to “buff” in. I mainly hit the edges and detail with the accent cream to give it a little more definition. I’ve raved about this product before, it’s so versatile and applies like a creamy dream. Metallic Accent cream is super high on my “all time love” paint product list.

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I decided on a diagonal planked table because I wanted this table to have a little bit of a fancy factor but also have the option to work in most décor schemes. The planks were cut from a 1×8 pine board with the slightest overhang. If you don’t have access to a chop saw, you could do this with a jigsaw and a steady hand, or see if your local hardware store would do the angled cuts. After my wooden pieces were cut and attached to the table from underneath using wood screws, I worked to sand the planks to be as level as possible, using the 100 grit sand paper. It’s important to sand all of the surface grain as equal as possible when using a stain.

 

I stained using a weathered grey wood stain (most stain lines carry a grey color in their line up these days) and a clean fabric cloth (wearing rubber gloves, stain can be so hard to clean off). I am new to grey stain, I really like it! However, it seems like more of a wash (watery paint) than a stain to me- if you aren’t careful the product will apply streaky, and if you haven’t equally sanded the surface the stain will take differently on the sanded areas versus the non-sanded areas. (Quick grey stain notes: sand evenly, apply stain evenly, use an additional dry cloth if needed to wipe down stain, let dry over night.)

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I liked how the accent cream added depth, but I wanted to soften the effect on the light basecoat. With my stain rag in hand I rubbed the weathered grey stain all over the table base. I didn’t need much stain on the rag at all. This stain is pretty malleable and takes a full 24 hours to dry. I was able to get the exact look I wanted with the stain and the cloth. You can see how much it masked the Metallic Cream in the photo above.

The last step was to apply Country Chic’s White Wax. I did this with a wax brush over the surface of the entire base. It’s best to let stain dry entirely before applying anything over it. Wax and wet stain will create a super sticky monster that will take days to dry (trust me). That wraps up this quick little planked table project.

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Happy painting,

 

Jessica

DIY, Paint Project

Combining Materials 

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Stump Stand with Country Chic Paint + Products

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This unique piece is a combination of uncommonly combined materials. I have a new love affair going on with wooden slices and I’ve been dreaming of ways to use Country Chic’s Metallic Accent cream. I love the product and am so in love with how it paints on so smooth with a brush. Any of the four glamorous colors would look so yummy on wood. I can just imagine a dinner party dressed with wooden chargers fancied up with some accent cream.

The base of this piece started as an antiqued teal wooden tray. It had been hanging around in my catch all space for too long. So, it was due for a little redesign!

 

For this project I used

  • Country Chic Vanilla Frosting Paint
  • Country Chic Antiquing Wax
  • Country Chic Metallic Accent Cream (Trigger)
  • Country Chic Natural Wax
  • Wax brush Synthetic bristle brush
  • Clean rag (old t-shirts work great)
  • Tree stump slice
  • Glass knob (Hobby Lobby)
  • Wood glue
  • Raw Coffee table leg (hardware store)
  • Screw driver, drill bit (pre drill wood slice for decor knob) and wood screws
  • Husband with patience (drilling part)

 

 

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My first step was to prep the table leg and tray. With clean, dry surfaces I used a dry brush to apply a liberal coat of Vanilla Frosting (side note: this is a great base color, not quite white- it’s my favorite).  I covered the surface on both items keeping in mind how I wanted the antique wax to “take” to the paint (wax will pick up your paint strokes, be mindful of your paint application if you plan on waxing a large area). For the leg, I left some of the wood visible. On raw wood an antique wax has a similar effect as stain. The dry brush application technique is a great way to achieve a smooth antiqued look, avoiding paint globs and uneven application. You can use your brush to smooth out the paint until you are satisfied with the outcome.

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While the tray and leg dried, I applied the accent cream to the top of my prepped stump. You can buy a ready to work with stump slice from a craft store. I used my scroll saw to get the flakey bark off for a smoother look, and lightly sanded to smooth the edges. The accent cream is a smooth and creamy texture and applies like butter. A cherry on top- it dries super quick! I love using it like paint, but it is great as its intended use for accent like a wax or glaze.

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Once the tray and leg paint dried, I began working on the antiquing wax. I used a wax brush, which created a wonderful layer to work with. I’ve doted before on my love for wax brushes. When waxing the table leg I was able to achieve a wonderful antiqued effect and fell in love with my wax brush even more. The brush can get into every nook and cranny, allowing your piece to get the full effect you’re trying to achieve.

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When waxing the tray, I used the brush to apply a concentrated amount of wax in one area and brushed, smoothed, circled, stroked it out to achieve varying thicknesses as I pleased. I let the wax dry overnight before assembling all of the pieces together, trying to avoid altering my wax-sterpiece.

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Moving back to the stump slice- I finished the dried accent cream off with an even coat of Country Chic Natural Wax, using a clean cloth. The stump didn’t need any wax, but I was on a roll and love how clear wax looks on raw wood.

Assembling this bad boy was a bit of a task.

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Luckily, my husband is super handy with a measuring tape and had some great tips (okay maybe he did all of the assembly, we really do make a great team) and helped me get it done. Two screws through the bottom of the tray + wood glue on both ends of the table leg + two screws through the top of the wood slice into the leg, and there she was, all connected. To insert the glass knob I predrilled a hole that was just a smidgen smaller than the screw part of the knob. Twist, twist, twist it into the stump and the knob was in place.

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This project is one of those quick fixes that can be done to a long list of odds and ends you may have laying around your house. I suggest trying to create something wonderful out of items that aren’t being used, or items that need a fun change. You’ll have yourself a one-of-a-kind piece and have a lot of pride in your new creation! Meaningful art.

 

Happy painting!

 

Jessica

Loveleigh Creative Soul

 

DIY

Update Your Art With Burlap and Furniture Tacks

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I have a few printed canvas pieces I’ve wanted to frame but haven’t really wanted to use my pretty pennies on the costly project. This little DIY trick is inexpensive and can be done with materials you may already have.

For this project I used:

  • Staple gun (standard craft size)
  • Burlap wired ribbon (any ribbon will do, it’s a little easier to work with if its equal or thicker width of your canvas )
  • Furniture Tacks (decorative tacks, upholstery would also work)
  • Hammer
  • Scissors
  • Canvas art (of any sort!)

This project is pretty snappy. First I wrapped the canvas with my burlap ribbon (you can purchase this at hobby lobby- I bought mine from a wholesale company. If you want a roll send me a shout in the contact form at the end of this post!) and snipped the end with a little extra to make a fold for clean looking finish. Don’t worry about the finished folds yet. Holding one end of the ribbon in place, just beyond one corner on the bottom side of the canvas, I tapped a nail in, only halfway, to secure the burlap. I’ll come back to this and tap it in all the way.

I bought the furniture tacks at a hardware store for $2 (25 in a pack). I didn’t measure the placement of my tacks- I was doing this during nap time so my clock was ticking. I just eyeballed the distribution to make the placemeant as even as possible. I used 4 furniture tacks on the longer sides and 3 on the shorter- of course you can use as many as you want. Make sure the ribbon is even with the front edge of the canvas. I made my way around the entire canvas and when I got back to the original furniture tack I pulled it out, made a fold on both ribbon ends, laid them back (one end overlapping the other) on the canvas and tapped the nail back in.  At this point the entire canvas edge is covered in burlap and I’ve used 14 furniture tacks to secure.

Now to “wrap” the burlap around the inside edge and staple in place.

Imagine you’re wrapping a gift, you’ll fold the extra burlap back around the canvas frame. I started in a corner. Make sure you don’t pull the ribbon back too far, as you’ll create unevenness on the edges where the burlap meets the front of the canvas. 

I didn’t staple first to  avoid uneven ribbon edges edges, the furniture nails help with that. Next, enjoy and rehang!

If you’re interested in purchasing these Home Sweet Homa canvases message me using the form below!  [contact-form-7 404 "Not Found"]